Report: Aaron Rodgers Told Packers He Does Not Want to Return

Report: Aaron Rodgers Told Packers He Does Not Want to Return

Earlier this week, the 49ers reportedly reached out to the Packers about a possible deal involving Rodgers.

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Reigning MVP Aaron Rodgers has told some within the Packers organization he does not want to return to the team next season, according to ESPN’s Adam Schefter. 

President Mark Murphy, general manager Brian Gutekunst and coach Matt LaFleur are aware of Rodgers’s sentiment.

“As we’ve stated since the season ended, we are committed to Aaron in 2021 and beyond,” Gutekunst told ESPN on Thursday. “Aaron has been a vital part of our success, and we look forward to competing for another championship with him leading our team.”

On Wednesday, the 49ers reached out to the Packers about acquiring Rodgers, but no formal offer was made, according to NFL Network’s Tom Pelissero. One of Pelissero’s sources says there is a “zero percent chance” Green Bay trades its franchise quarterback.

Fox Sports’ Jay Glazer also reported on Thursday that a few teams had called the Packers about Rodgers, but did not provide specifics about any particular franchises.

The Rams also reportedly “made a run” at Rodgers this offseason, but the Packers were “adamant” about not dealing him. The Rams instead traded for former Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford.

According to ESPN, the Packers have offered to extend Rodgers’s contract this offseason. According to NFL Network’s Ian Rapoport, Rodgers’s agent Dave Dunn has traveled to Green Bay for several days of meetings to work through the situation, but Rodgers’s team has refused a restructure and rebuffed any deals.

Rapoport later reported that Rodgers “impressed the brass” during his tenure on Jeopardy, and there’s reportedly reason to believe the quarterback could be a final candidate for the full-time position when they finish auditions. 

However, Fox Sports is also reporting the frustration is beyond a contract issue and that Rodgers is strongly convicted that he does not want to return to Green Bay.

According to Trey Wingo, the Packers told Rodgers they were going to trade him during the offseason but then backed off. The quarterback reportedly told the franchise within the last week that he would not return, trade or no trade. 

Later on Thursday, ProFootballTalk tweeted that Rodgers’s wishlist (as of Wednesday night) included 49ers, Broncos and Raiders. He reportedly wanted Green Bay to take San Francisco’s offer. 

Earlier this week, Gutekunst told reporters the franchise was committed to Rodgers “for the foreseeable future,” adding, “Aaron’s our guy.”

“We’re excited about the things we’re going to try to accomplish here over the next couple years.”

According to ESPN’s Rob Demovsky, if the Packers trade Rodgers on Thursday, the franchise would save $5.646 million in salary-cap space. But if it happens after June 1, they would save $22.850 million in cap space. The quarterback’s contract is through 2023, but he has no guaranteed money left in the agreement.  

In last year’s draft, the Packers traded the No. 30 pick and a fourth-round pick to the Dolphins for the 26th pick and selected quarterback Jordan Love. In doing so Love became the first offensive player drafted by Green Bay in the first round since 2005.

Last season, Rodgers led the Packers to a 13–3 record and an appearance in the NFC championship game. He also won his third MVP award.

After the playoff loss to the Buccaneers, Rodgers said, “A lot of guys’ futures are uncertain—myself included,” but he later clarified those remarks on The Pat McAfee Show, saying, “I don’t feel like I said anything that I hadn’t said before. It was just more of a realization, I think, that ultimately my future is not necessarily in my control. I think that was just kind of what hit me in the moment.”

He added: “I don’t think that there’s any reason why I wouldn’t be back.”

More NFL Draft Coverage:

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Bishop: Trey Lance Is Just Different
Prewitt: The Year of the Opt-Out Prospect
Rosenberg: Justin Fields, the Player and the Story Line
Kahler: The Search for 2021’s Prospect X

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